Category BASICS ARCHITECTURE

0

Rapid prototyping

Rapid prototyping refers to a modelling process that can fabricate a physical scale model using three-dimensional CAD data. What is commonly considered to be the first rapid prototyping technique, stereolithography, was developed in 1986 by 3D Systems (based in Valencia, CA, USA).

Rapid prototyping is also referred to as solid free-form manufacturing, computer automated manufacturing and layered manufacturing. All four labels essentially refer to the same workflow; a computer is connected to machinery that interprets the data and creates the three-dimensional model. The model is then produced by the machine using layers of paper, plastic or other materials. Rapid prototyping means that the exact same model exists in both virtual (CAD) and physical form.

CAD software

To make a CAD m...

Read More
0

Scale and finishes

Introducing objects for which we understand the scale will make a model appear more realistic and help the viewer to understand the proportions of the architecture. These objects might be model figures, cars or trees – any elements that are immediately accessible to the viewer.

The finish should be an important consideration at all stages of the model’s construction. Time needs to be taken when cutting materials to ensure that they are cut accurately, and care taken when assembling the pieces. This care will ensure that the model is considered as an important part of the whole design presentation.

Notes on adhesives

Different materials will require different adhesives to allow them to fix properly...

Read More
0

Transparent materials

Project: John Roan School Location: London, UK Architect: Architecture Plb (model by David Grandorge) Date: 2007

Models made from wood can be easily adapted and developed.

This model shows part of a scheme proposal for a school relocation in London. The wood adds a variety of colours and textures to the mode.

Models made from wood can be easily adapted and developed. Most commonly used for model making, balsa wood comes from a tropical tree source and is very light (it has a density that is a third of other hardwoods), so it is easy to cut, which is good for creating accurate models.

Other woods can be used to provide particular finishes.

Cork, for example, can be used to give a carpet-like effect to a surface, which is useful for city-scale models.

Wood can be finely sanded an...

Read More
0

Polystyrene and styrofoam

Polystyrene is very flexible and can be cut and shaped easily to create organic forms. Styrofoam is a board material that can be easily cut, shaped, glued and painted. It has a finely textured surface that provides a smooth finish for model making. It is also lightweight, easy to handle and reusable.

Read More
0

Foam board

Foam board describes a piece of foam that is sandwiched between two thin pieces of card. It is available in a variety of weights, which means that it is a useful material for representing different wall widths. It is also a fairly sturdy material, so on smaller models is self-supporting. Coloured foam board can be used to suggest different material finishes.

Read More