Category Timber-Framed, Buildings of England

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Industrial Buildings

The use of timber framing in the construction of industrial buildings was at one time a common feature in many parts of the country. Of these, undoubtedly the finest to survive are the windmills – post and smock – which still grace the countryside in eastern England and the South-East as well as the odd example in the Midlands. Of almost equal charm and more numerous are the timber-framed watermills which are still to be found on the many rivers over much of the same area. Also within the group are warehouses, storage sheds, makings, workshops used for local crafts (for instance, blacksmiths, wheel­wrights and the like) and even toll cottages.

To these buildings must be added the numerous timber-framed cottages used for the many cottage industries prior to the Industrial Revolution, parti...

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Dovecot, Hawford, Hereford & Worcester

Dovecot, Hawford, Hereford & Worcester

Dovecot, Hawford, Hereford & Worcester

<2. ovv гм 82.

Dovecot, Hawford, Hereford &amp;amp; Worcester

192. Dovecot, Pimp Hall Farm, Chigwell, Greater London

to eight or so depending on size, fitted with either a separate or more often a continuous landing platform. Access into the dovecot was usually by means of a door into the back from the inside of the farm building.

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Farm buildings, dovecots

The best-known type is the free-standing one, either circular, square, rectangular or multi-sided in plan. Means of access for the birds varied, but probably the most common was the glover, an open-sided structure on the ridge, while access into the dovecot for people was by means of a small door. Internally around the walls were rows of L-shaped nestboxes which could vary from a hundred or so up to two thousand.

Nowadays pigeons are no longer kept on farms for food but many dovecots, often used as stores, still survive. Amongst the most attrac­tive are those constructed of timber. In Hereford & Worcester the National Trust own two excellent examples in the county – one at The Grange, Hawford (189), and one at Wichenford (190), both of seventeenth-century date...

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Farm buildings, cartsheds

Dovecots

Until the eighteenth century, with the introduction of root crops, the wintering of animals was restricted to those required for breeding, the others being killed either for immediate consumption or salting for eating later. To supplement the limited diet, fresh meat was provided by keeping pigeons, not wood pigeons which breed only twice a year but domesticated pigeons which have an exceptionally short breeding cycle. Every six weeks for nearly the whole year they are capable of laying a pair of eggs, hatching them out, fattening up two squabs on pigeon milk and then laying two more eggs. Evidently, to maintain the numbers at full strength indefinitely, it is only necessary to keep back one pair from each nest every seven years – the useful breeding life of a pair.

In medieval ti...

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Farm buildings, cattlesheds

split door. From the middle of the nineteenth century onwards more importance was given to the housing of cattle, and legislation, particu­larly that of 1885 and 1926, laid down that more hygienic accommo­dation was to be provided, with more windows and ventilation. In addition, as hay was at this time only part of the winter diet, the cattleshed became open to the roof, the hay being kept in stacks or hay barns.

Another method of housing cattle, and one commonly employed, was the open shelter opening up onto a foldyard. Foldyards became a feature from the late eighteenth century onwards with the increasing number of cattle being kept over winter...

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